BT Arise II - шаблон joomla Продвижение

Preposition: Over

1. Over means above.   

Pattern 1: verb + over + noun
The plane flew over our building.
The pictures were hanging over the sofa.
        

Typical verbs used before over:
be, bend, float, fly, hang, hover, lean, look, shine, watch

Pattern 2: verb + noun + over + noun
She hung the pictures over the sofa.
               

Typical verbs used with this pattern:
float, fly, hang, hold, install, nail, place, suspend                   

Expression:
to hold something over one's head—to control, threaten, or punish someone because of a known fact or misdeed
She knows he was fired from his last job; now she holds that over his head.                         

2. Over can mean higher than.                     

Pattern: be + (way) over + noun
The price of that vacation is (way) over our budget.
The water at this end of the pool is over your head.
                

Expression:
be over one's head—more than one can understand
I can do simple math, but that problem is way over my head.             

3. Over (adverb) can mean more than.                      

Pattern: over + number + noun
He was driving at over eighty miles an hour.
I have gained over five pounds this month.
                 

4. Over indicates movement above something and to the other side of it.                                                                           

Pattern 1: verb + over + noun
The children jumped over the puddles on their way to school.
We had to climb over the mountain to get here.
                                   

Typical verbs used before over:
cross, climb, drive, get, go, hop, jump, look, run, skate, skip, step, stumble, trip                   

Pattern 2: verb + noun + over + noun
The young player batted the ball over the fence.
We had fun throwing rocks over the creek.
                  

Typical verbs:
bat, carry, drive, hit, throw                  

5. Over can mean covering something.     

Pattern: verb + noun + over + noun
The child wore a warm jacket over her dress.
The lady sewed patches over the holes.
                      

Typical verbs:
drape, hang, have, paint, place, pour, pull, put, sew, spread, tape, wear                     

6. Over indicates control.              

Pattern 1: rule/preside + over + noun
She rules over her family like a tyrant.
The chairman asked me to preside over the meeting tonight.
             

Pattern 2: have control/power + over + noun
They have no control over their actions.
He likes to have power over his associates.
                

7. Over can mean location on the other side of something.
That restaurant is over the state line.
They live over the river.
                                                                       

Typical verbs:
be, be located, dwell, live, lie, reside               

8. All over can mean in many parts of a place.                    

Pattern: verb + all + over + the + noun
They have traveled all over the world.
She looked all over the city for her friend.
                  

Typical nouns:
city, country, field, floor, house, place, playground, sidewalk, state, street, table, town, world, yard               

Typical verbs:
broadcast, crawl, drive, look, roll, run, send, spill, throw, travel, walk                        

9. Over can mean during.             

Pattern 1: over + noun
We had an interesting discussion over breakfast this morning.
           

Typical nouns after over:
breakfast, coffee, dinner, drinks, lunch, snacks, tea                

Pattern 2: over + the + noun
They decided to read the papers over the holidays.
She has been sick over the last three weeks.
                           

Nouns commonly used with this pattern:
holidays, summer, weekend, winter
next (number) hours, days, weeks, months, years
last (number) hours, days, weeks, months, years
                    

10. Over can indicate a topic.    

Pattern: verb + over + noun
They argued over politics all night.
I wish you wouldn't fight over money.
             

Typical verbs used before over:
argue, battle, cry, fight, grieve, gush, puzzle, sigh, worry                   

11. Over (adverb) can mean again.                      

Pattern: verb + noun + over
She didn't like my work; she told me to do it over.
                  

Typical verbs used before over:
do, read, start, write                            

12. Expressions                     

over the telephone—by means of telephone
She gave me that information over the telephone.                   

head over heels—completely
He is head over heels in love with her.            

13. (All) over (adverb) means finished.
The party was over at nine o'clock.                 

14. Phrasal verbs                 

blow over (intransitive)—be forgotten
Don't worry about your argument with him; I'm sure it will blow over.            

fall over (intransitive)—collapse
She was sitting at her desk when she suddenly fell over.        

hand over (separable)—give reluctantly
The children had to hand over all the money they found.                    

have over (separable)—invite to one's home
We want to have you over soon.                                  

look over (separable)—review
Please look over these papers before the meeting tomorrow.              

pass over (separable)—not give an expected promotion
She expected to be promoted to director, but she was passed over this year.             

pick over (separable)—find and choose the best of a lot
Some of these cherries are not ripe; you will have to pick them over carefully.           

pull over (intransitive)—drive to the side of the road
We were driving too fast, and the police officer made us pull over.                 

pull over (separable)—move to cover something
Pull the sweater over your head.                                 

take over (intransitive)—become the boss, or act like a boss
The children don't like to play with that boy because he always tries to take over.                   

take over (separable)—carry something to another place
Please take this letter over to your neighbor.                      

think over (separable)—consider the pros and cons
Your offer interests us; we will think it over.                            

turn over (intransitive)—change position from face down, face up, or vice versa
Most babies turn over in the first six months of life.                                                   

turn over (separable)—move something from top to bottom, or vice versa
Some kids turned all the trash cans over last night.